Protecting our biodiversity is up to all of us.

We’re working with experts, communities, Traditional Owners, farmers, government and industries to solve Australia’s biodiversity crisis. And that includes you.

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Australia’s biodiversity is recognised and valued nationally and globally as a priceless heritage, a foundation for our life and a defining feature of our country, and its future is recovered or secured.

Latest Stories

Here you will find a collection of stories, media releases, announcements and events

Welcoming our new Executive Director

We are delighted to welcome our new Executive Director Ilsa Colson, who has started this week. Ilsa has 20 years' experience working with government, business and non-profits to achieve real outcomes for the community and the environment. She's been an advisor to Federal and State Ministers in portfolios including environment, water, climate change and education. She's held leadership roles in organisations including the Clean Energy Council, Zoos Victoria and Parks Victoria. She was Chief of Staff to the Victorian Deputy Premier for seven years, and is a graduate of the Australian Institute of Company Directors. She owns a small rural block that she is slowly revegetating with the express purpose of supporting biodiversity.

A new biodiversity agreement for the world at CoP15: how did we get there, and what does it mean?

World leaders from close to 200 delegations have signed up to a new Global Biodiversity Framework. The long-awaited deal firms up commitments to ensure 30 per cent of land, freshwater and marine areas are protected, with a priority on biodiversity hotspots. The agreement recognises the crucial role of Indigenous people in protecting our plants, animals and ecosystems, and,  with a strong showing from sustainable business leaders, places expectations on businesses to report how they rely on and impact biodiversity. But the deal missed the opportunity to set ambitious targets to end extinctions, and there's much more to be done to ensure the commitments expressed translate into meaningful investment and action both in and beyond protected areas. See how events unfolded at our CoP 15 Blog, and read our analysis on the key wins, ongoing concerns and the road ahead.

The government’s plan to overhaul environmental laws looks good, but crucial detail is yet to come

The Australian Government's response to Graeme Samuel's 2020 review of our Federal environmental laws promises substantial advances. Minister Plibersek has announced an independent Federal Environmental Protection Agency, strong national standards including for forests (which are currently exempted from close scrutiny through Regional Forest Agreements), and regional planning to ensure environmental decisions are more strategic and address the pattern of death by a thousand cuts. The Minister has also promised to rapidly create and implement conservation advice documents, with regulatory teeth, that outline threats and actions needed to protect every one of the species and ecosystems listed as at risk of extinction. But some crucial questions remain about implementation and the weakening of offset measures. The key will be in making sure the laws sufficiently robust and the changes are timely—and that detail is yet to be worked through.

Read more from our Councillors Brendan Wintle, Martine Maron and Sarah Bekessy on what will be needed to ensure the overhaul of these laws make the difference they need to, to protect and recover our biodiversity.

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Council launching to spearhead solutions for our biodiversity crisis

Leading experts including Indigenous knowledge holders from 11 Australian universities have united with philanthropists to form a new council which will advocate for biodiversity.

Australia is seeing catastrophic declines in local plants, animals, and ecosystems. This presents a major threat to humanity, from our economy, food systems, water and health, through to our culture and identity, yet the group say solutions to halt these declines exist. 

The Biodiversity Council, which will be incubated at the University of Melbourne, will foster public, policy and industry recognition of the biodiversity crisis, the importance of biodiversity for wellbeing and prosperity, and positive opportunities and solutions to address these challenges. 

The Minister for Environment and Water, Tanya Plibersek MP will launch the Biodiversity Council this evening (by video), together with University of Melbourne Vice-Chancellor, Professor Duncan Maskell. 

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Big ideas to promote nature as a climate solution

While urgent action is needed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and protect our climate. But did you know that trees and plants are still the only viable carbon storage mechanism we have that can work on a significant scale? Global leaders have called for a focus on reforestation to help us reduce greenhouse gases while we transition our energy systems. Here in Australia, there's a lot we can do to help nature and the climate, while supporting Indigenous groups and regional and urban communities to thrive. Here we outline 5 big ideas that will make a difference.

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University of Queensland, Chief Councillor

Professor Hugh Possingham

University of Melbourne, Chief Councillor

Dr Jack Pascoe

University of Melbourne

Professor Brendan Wintle

University of Tasmania

Professor Jan McDonald

Monash University

Professor Liam Smith

University of Western Australia

Assoc. Professor Nicki Mitchell

University of Canberra

Professor Ross Thompson

RMIT University

Professor Sarah Bekessy

University of Queensland, Chief Councillor

Professor Hugh Possingham

University of Melbourne, Chief Councillor

Dr Jack Pascoe

University of Melbourne

Professor Brendan Wintle

University of Tasmania

Professor Jan McDonald

Monash University

Professor Liam Smith

University of Western Australia

Assoc. Professor Nicki Mitchell

University of Canberra

Professor Ross Thompson

RMIT University

Professor Sarah Bekessy